Works&Projects

Yo-yo Yo-yo
by Richard Hylton and Bashir Makhoul

old film still showing man in western costume and man in African tribal costume

Images:

  • 1Still from Yo-Yo Yo-Yo
  • 2Still from Yo-Yo Yo-Yo
  • 3Still from Yo-Yo Yo-Yo

Still from Yo-yo Yo-yo

Synopsis:

Migration exists on numerous levels from the personal to the public, from the tourist to the asylum seeker. Yo-yo Yo-yo uses images of travel to suggest the perpetual voyage in search of a cultural home. Archival footage taken by Makhoul’s grandfather is interlaced with animated footage of a giraffe.

Hylton, born to Spanish parents, and Palestinian artist Makhoul, who came to Britain from Israel to study in the 1980s came together to explore their different experiences of cultural migration / displacement and to raise questions about notions of 'belonging' and 'not belonging'. In his essay to accompany the film Sean Cubitt wrote:

'The giraffe, alone among quadrupeds, lifts its two left legs forwards in synch with one another, then its right, walking in step with itself like a pantomime horse. No beast was ever as surreal. No creature better emblematises the unforgiving absurdity of evolution, nor better encapsulates the way in which this utterest abstraction of the wild becomes the endearing, familiar, icon of the tourist trip par excellence, safari.'

The work was projected after dark onto a pyramid structure located on Pulteney Bridge in Bath, UK.

 

Details:

Year 1996
Duration 5 minutes
Medium
Original format
Screening format
Aspect ratio
Audio Yes
Colour / B&W Colour
Screens

Credits:

Commissioned by Picture This and Bath Festivals Trust. Supported by The Arts Council of Engalnd; South West Arts; Bristol City Council; Picture This and Bath Festivals Trust.

Screening history:

16 -26 May 1996
Pultney Weir (by Riverside Walk), Bath, UK
Viewed from Grande Parade or Riverside Walk 9pm-11pm

Related Items:

Essays
Yo-yo Yo-yo

Writer and accademic Sean Cubitt's essay looks at global tourism and our facination with recording and playing-back our found treasures and memories.

Artists
Richard Hylton and Bashir Makhoul

Bashir Makhoul and Richard Hylton came together to explore their different experiences of cultural migration / displacement and to raise questions